How I made curtains

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How to make curtains

1. Pick out fabric.

2. Cut out fabric. Cut fabric 2 inches wider than the curtains that you’d like and 10 inches longer.

3. Hem the side edges. Fold edges in 1/2 an inch. Than fold over again half an inch. Sew along the hem. (Sorry this isn’t pictured. Sometimes I forget to photograph everything.)

4. Create hanging loops for the top. (Also not pictured.) I cut out 16 squares that were 5 inches by 4 inches. I folded the squares in half on the 5 inch side and sewed them together to create 5 inch long loops. I turned them inside right and ironed them flat.

5. Iron the top edge of curtains as shown.

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I’ll try to explain a little more. First lay fabric so that the front of the curtains is facing up. Fold the top edge fabric 1/2 an inch onto the curtain and iron flat. Fold another 1/2 an inch down and iron again. Turn the fabric over and fold the top edge half an inch that direction. You should now have a nice little pocket to sew the loops into.

6. Tuck the loops into fold as shown. And pin the loops down. I used 8 loops on each of my curtains. I placed the first one on the edge and then the others were placed roughly 8 inches apart.

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7. Sew two seems along the top edge to hold the loops and such in place. In the photo above you can see that I’ve sown the top curtain together already.

8. Hem the bottom of the curtains. I folded these 3 inches than rolled it up three more inches so that the bottom has a little more weight and hangs better. It depends on how long you want your curtains. In another room I made curtains with a 4 inch hem on the bottom.

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9. Package them up and send them on their merry way!

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THE END!

What I learned from making my first quilt

I started making this quilt awhile ago, probably several years ago. I picked out the colors, cut out the squares and packed it all up and put it into storage. It seemed simple enough to start with but I quickly realized that it was going to take too much time and patience, which are things I didn’t have in great quantities.

Recently I was cleaning out my art room so I could upgrade it into a baby nursery and I found my lovely little quilt squares. At this point in my life, full of pregnancy fatigue and such, I realized that I have lots of time and would love to work on a project that is somewhat slow and tedious. So here’s where I started…

1. I sewed the blues and purples together and ironed them flat.

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2. I cut the extra off the sides so they will be easier to sew together.

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3. Then I drew a light pencil line on the back of the yellows making sure to lay them out properly. Notice that in one of these photos is an example of what my finished squares will look like.

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4. Stack them up in a pretty pile.

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5. Sew a 1/4 inch on both side of the pencil line.

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6. Check to make sure it looks right before cutting them apart.

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And that’s where I stopped for the day. So I learned that while I’m pregnant I don’t have the energy for my normal activities, but there are still fun things to do besides watching TV and laying on the couch. :)

DIY Banquette Seat | Ikea Hack | Dining Room Makeover

Very cool.

Melodrama

And the dining room saga continues…

Because we have a small awkward space, I thought it would be a good idea to use a banquette style seat to complete our dining set. I’m that person who always requests a booth at restaurants, so I was set on it. We shopped around for one but none were right for us. The size, color, style, and price were always off. I started thinking about how I could pull off a DIY version. I thought about using kitchen cabinets or building a frame like the kind I’ve seen in custom kitchens, but Jvee said NO. We don’t have the tools or the space to pull that off. During a trip to IKEA, I noticed one of the EXPEDIT shelving units was turned on its side (I’d seen it used before as window and bench seating) and seemed durable enough to sit on. It…

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