What I learned from making my first quilt

I started making this quilt awhile ago, probably several years ago. I picked out the colors, cut out the squares and packed it all up and put it into storage. It seemed simple enough to start with but I quickly realized that it was going to take too much time and patience, which are things I didn’t have in great quantities.

Recently I was cleaning out my art room so I could upgrade it into a baby nursery and I found my lovely little quilt squares. At this point in my life, full of pregnancy fatigue and such, I realized that I have lots of time and would love to work on a project that is somewhat slow and tedious. So here’s where I started…

1. I sewed the blues and purples together and ironed them flat.

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2. I cut the extra off the sides so they will be easier to sew together.

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3. Then I drew a light pencil line on the back of the yellows making sure to lay them out properly. Notice that in one of these photos is an example of what my finished squares will look like.

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4. Stack them up in a pretty pile.

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5. Sew a 1/4 inch on both side of the pencil line.

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6. Check to make sure it looks right before cutting them apart.

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And that’s where I stopped for the day. So I learned that while I’m pregnant I don’t have the energy for my normal activities, but there are still fun things to do besides watching TV and laying on the couch. :)

20 THINGS I WISH I KNEW ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY POSING: from photographyawesomesauce

This list came from a very cool website: photographyawesomesauce.

http://photographyawesomesauce.com/20-things-i-wish-i-knew-about-photography-posing/

1. Don’t shoot shoulders square on. Shoulders are the widest part of a body and as a photographer it is our job to flatter the least flattering parts of our bodies. Shooting straight on is not flattering. Angle the shoulders slightly to lead the viewer into the photo.

2. If it bends, then bend it. Don’t let your clients have straight joints. It looks stiff and unrelaxed. Asking your client instead to slightly bend an arm or walk as they have their photo taken will help your client look relaxed and naturally posed. This rule also applies to the neck. If the neck looks stiff, ask your client to tilt their head slightly.

3. Shoot straight on, or better from above. Shooting from below a person makes even the most gorgeous subject look awkward. Shooting from above can make someone appear slimmer, eliminates double chins, and can provide a beautiful look into your subjects eyes. Shooting from below can make someone’s hips appear wider than they are or any other body part and this is generally unflattering.

4. No up the nose. Sometimes we forget our perspective and as moms when we photograph newborns we look at them the way a mom would holding them and take a photo. Anytime you are shooting a face from below or at an angle, be careful you are not doing ‘up the nose’ shots where you can see up your client’s nostrils. This can happen during any type of photography, so it’s good to be aware.

5. Sharkeyes. Sharkeyes are when someone’s eyes in a photo are black and have no light or color to them. Ensure that the eyes of your clients have good catchlights or sparkle to them by asking them to tilt their head or turn slightly one way or another. These small movements can give that sparkle to a client’s eye that can make or break a photo.

6. Put weight on the back leg. Have clients angle their shoulders so they’re not square to your camera and put their weight on their back leg. This automatically makes them relax.

7. Give your clients lots of direction. Most people are uncomfortable in front of the camera and you have to direct them. Giving them direction will help them feel confident and that confidence will show up in the photos.

8. Let one pose become many. You can move your own feet, or zoom in or zoom out or move slightly to the side and take photos from different angles.

9. Have your clients look places other than your camera. You can tell them to look away, look down over their shoulder, look past your camera to provide a different emotion to your photos.

10. Give your clients encouragement. When they’re in front of the camera they can’t see what they look like and they need to know if they look good. When they hit a good pose or you’re taking photos that you know have hit the mark, let them know how good they look.

11. Portraits are traditionally shot a few degrees above the eyes.

12. Bring a stepstool with you to all your photography shoots and weddings.

13. Talk to your clients. Getting to know them gives them a sense of trust with you. You want your subject to trust that you know what you’re doing and can make them look good.

14. Sometimes people’s faces get stiff. Ask your clients to take a deep breath and breath out with their lips slightly open. The few moments after this your clients face will be relaxed and natural – so snap a few. If that doesn’t work, ask them to do the “pufferfish” face where they blow up their cheeks and then let it all out. That helps their face to relax too. If you do it with them, they won’t feel as silly.

15. Give them something to do with their hands. They can touch their cheek, run their hands through their hair, put their hands on a nearby object…something.

16. Show them what you mean. Instead of trying to tell your client how to pose, get in the pose to show them how you want it to look. You’re a photographer right? You are visual and probably learn visually and it’s likely that your clients are visual learners too!

17. Be aware of ears. Shooting people straight on can make their ears appear large. With women if they are tucking their hair behind their ear or if their ear sticks out just slightly it can be one of those things that will bother them later in photos and can sometimes look distorted when in 2-dimensional photography form.

18. Get close. One of the biggest newbie mistakes is to shoot from far away and get lots of the background or landscape in the photo. This happens a lot when we’re not confident with posing. If you force yourself to get close the photo becomes more about the clients and their interactions with each other or with you than about the background.

19. Limbs. If you are cropping out anyone’s body ensure that your crop lines do not fall at the joints (wrists, knees, elbows, etc.). When this happens it gives the appearance that the subject’s body does not continue past the frame of the photo. Instead if you have to crop, do it where there isn’t a join and this will give the impression that the rest of their arm, leg, etc. continues beyond the photo.

20. Watch for shadows and light. There’s a reason a lot of photographers like to shoot in that ‘golden hour’ either in the wee hours in the morning or just before sunset. The light is even and not harsh and it prevents you from having strange shadows on your clients faces. Shadows below the nose or below the eyes can give your client the appearance of not being as good looking as they truly are. Whatever time of day you are shooting aim to ensure that your clients faces are in perfectly even light where there are no harsh shadows. If you have to shoot in the middle of the day, shoot in the shade.

Pollen and Puppies

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Spring is in full swing in Tennessee. My puppy, Kieran, and I spent some time outside today and I couldn’t believe how much pollen there was out there! He, however, was not displeased to find all the pollen. He licked it up off the front porch where it had collected in little drifts. I found that to be a little gross. When he was done it looked like he had been eating donuts covered in yellow powdered sugar. My puppy is weird but cute.

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