PHOTOGRAPHY TIP: How to create your own watermark for FREE!

Some fans have asked me how to make a custom watermark for their photography. Here’s a good blog to read!

Feet from Shore

photography watermark

Last week I promised I’d post a tutorial on how to make a custom watermark for your photos without the need of using expensive photo-editing software like Photoshop or Lightroom, and here it is!  Before I had access to Photoshop, I used PicMonkey as my go-to source for all my basic photo-editing needs and to design my old FeetfromShore button and header. I didn’t want to pay someone to make that for me, so I used this online photo editor to make my blog more personal. It’s very intuitive and easy to use – you’ll be a pro in no time! Ok then, let’s get started.

follow arrowstep 1

Go to PicMonkey and select “Create a collage” from the main screen.

Watermark 1

s2
The Collage editing screen opens up. Remove two cells to have just one single cell. Select the Background option on the bottom left side of the screen and check the “transparent background” option.

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20 THINGS I WISH I KNEW ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY POSING: from photographyawesomesauce

This list came from a very cool website: photographyawesomesauce.

http://photographyawesomesauce.com/20-things-i-wish-i-knew-about-photography-posing/

1. Don’t shoot shoulders square on. Shoulders are the widest part of a body and as a photographer it is our job to flatter the least flattering parts of our bodies. Shooting straight on is not flattering. Angle the shoulders slightly to lead the viewer into the photo.

2. If it bends, then bend it. Don’t let your clients have straight joints. It looks stiff and unrelaxed. Asking your client instead to slightly bend an arm or walk as they have their photo taken will help your client look relaxed and naturally posed. This rule also applies to the neck. If the neck looks stiff, ask your client to tilt their head slightly.

3. Shoot straight on, or better from above. Shooting from below a person makes even the most gorgeous subject look awkward. Shooting from above can make someone appear slimmer, eliminates double chins, and can provide a beautiful look into your subjects eyes. Shooting from below can make someone’s hips appear wider than they are or any other body part and this is generally unflattering.

4. No up the nose. Sometimes we forget our perspective and as moms when we photograph newborns we look at them the way a mom would holding them and take a photo. Anytime you are shooting a face from below or at an angle, be careful you are not doing ‘up the nose’ shots where you can see up your client’s nostrils. This can happen during any type of photography, so it’s good to be aware.

5. Sharkeyes. Sharkeyes are when someone’s eyes in a photo are black and have no light or color to them. Ensure that the eyes of your clients have good catchlights or sparkle to them by asking them to tilt their head or turn slightly one way or another. These small movements can give that sparkle to a client’s eye that can make or break a photo.

6. Put weight on the back leg. Have clients angle their shoulders so they’re not square to your camera and put their weight on their back leg. This automatically makes them relax.

7. Give your clients lots of direction. Most people are uncomfortable in front of the camera and you have to direct them. Giving them direction will help them feel confident and that confidence will show up in the photos.

8. Let one pose become many. You can move your own feet, or zoom in or zoom out or move slightly to the side and take photos from different angles.

9. Have your clients look places other than your camera. You can tell them to look away, look down over their shoulder, look past your camera to provide a different emotion to your photos.

10. Give your clients encouragement. When they’re in front of the camera they can’t see what they look like and they need to know if they look good. When they hit a good pose or you’re taking photos that you know have hit the mark, let them know how good they look.

11. Portraits are traditionally shot a few degrees above the eyes.

12. Bring a stepstool with you to all your photography shoots and weddings.

13. Talk to your clients. Getting to know them gives them a sense of trust with you. You want your subject to trust that you know what you’re doing and can make them look good.

14. Sometimes people’s faces get stiff. Ask your clients to take a deep breath and breath out with their lips slightly open. The few moments after this your clients face will be relaxed and natural – so snap a few. If that doesn’t work, ask them to do the “pufferfish” face where they blow up their cheeks and then let it all out. That helps their face to relax too. If you do it with them, they won’t feel as silly.

15. Give them something to do with their hands. They can touch their cheek, run their hands through their hair, put their hands on a nearby object…something.

16. Show them what you mean. Instead of trying to tell your client how to pose, get in the pose to show them how you want it to look. You’re a photographer right? You are visual and probably learn visually and it’s likely that your clients are visual learners too!

17. Be aware of ears. Shooting people straight on can make their ears appear large. With women if they are tucking their hair behind their ear or if their ear sticks out just slightly it can be one of those things that will bother them later in photos and can sometimes look distorted when in 2-dimensional photography form.

18. Get close. One of the biggest newbie mistakes is to shoot from far away and get lots of the background or landscape in the photo. This happens a lot when we’re not confident with posing. If you force yourself to get close the photo becomes more about the clients and their interactions with each other or with you than about the background.

19. Limbs. If you are cropping out anyone’s body ensure that your crop lines do not fall at the joints (wrists, knees, elbows, etc.). When this happens it gives the appearance that the subject’s body does not continue past the frame of the photo. Instead if you have to crop, do it where there isn’t a join and this will give the impression that the rest of their arm, leg, etc. continues beyond the photo.

20. Watch for shadows and light. There’s a reason a lot of photographers like to shoot in that ‘golden hour’ either in the wee hours in the morning or just before sunset. The light is even and not harsh and it prevents you from having strange shadows on your clients faces. Shadows below the nose or below the eyes can give your client the appearance of not being as good looking as they truly are. Whatever time of day you are shooting aim to ensure that your clients faces are in perfectly even light where there are no harsh shadows. If you have to shoot in the middle of the day, shoot in the shade.

Ask the Art Professor: How do you sell your art?

This was a helpful article for fine artists on selling their work.

Clara Lieu

"Control" Exhibition

“How do you sell your art?”

There is now a multitude of options for selling your art, many more than existed a few decades ago thanks to the Internet. You have to troubleshoot which venue is most appropriate for you and your work, as different venues will provide different results. My suggestion would be to experiment with different venues and see what works and what doesn’t.

A large factor of selling art is marketing and promotion.  I’ve seen artists with mediocre work doing extremely well because their work was aggressively promoted the right way.  I’ve also seen some really wonderful artists who haven’t done as well because their work wasn’t marketed appropriately.

Below I list the main venues and opportunities for selling your work. Some of the venues below have a highly selective screening process, while others are open to anyone.

Clara Lieu

1) Selling online
Now with sites like Etsy and

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Day 362 – Stay A Little Longer

This is a beautiful photo. I love the colors!

Ian Spagnolo Photography

Stay A Little Longer

One of my biggest mistakes when starting out in my photographic journey was leaving after I thought the best light had passed. I now make sure I stay a little longer, because like this morning, a dull grey sunrise can quickly throw a splash of colour out for a moment and make things a little more interesting.

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